Review: The Mistletoe Pact by Jo Lovett

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“On Christmas Eve eight years ago Evie and Dan made a pact: if they weren’t married by thirty, they were going to marry each other. Of course, neither of them took it seriously, even if Dan has always been mesmerised by Evie’s beautiful smile, and Evie has always fancied Dan, her best-friend’s brother.

But then “it” happens. They wake up on Christmas Eve, the night before Evie’s thirtieth birthday in Vegas… married. In a honeymoon suite filled with hundreds of heart-shaped pillows, they realise too late what they’ve done – just like Ross and Rachel.

Surely if they just get a quickie divorce, they can go back to the way things used to be, right? If it wasn’t for the alcohol and Susan-with-the-huge-beehive-hairdo who just wouldn’t take no for an answer, none of this would have happened. They can just go back to being friends.

Except moving on is easier said than done when you’ve secretly loved each other forever… but if one of them doesn’t admit that, what happens to their friendship? If they don’t get together this time, what happens to the pact? Are they really ready to let it go for good?”

REVIEW:

The Mistletoe Pact follows Evie and Dan. Dan is the older brother of Evie’s childhood best friend, Sasha. They’ve always kinda had crushes on each other but never really acted on them. We learn about their mistletoe pact, a deal they made that if neither one was married by Evie’s 30th birthday, they would get married. It was made in jest but always hung around in the back of their minds. The story jumps around time-wise. We open on Evie’s 30th birthday with Dan and Evie having had a true drunken one-night stand in Vegas and actually gotten married. Both so spooked by this and terrified to destroy their friendship, both panic and ignore having a serious conversation immediately getting the marriage annulled. We go back in time to get a sense of how their friendship started. We also jump to the year after their spur-of-the-moment wedding and annulment. Evie and Dan both have baggage from seeing their parents’ relationships growing up. Evie was raised by a single mom who always had a new boyfriend of the month. She just wants to have stability with whoever she chooses to grow old with. While Dan watched his father cheat regularly and ultimately leave his mother. He’s terrified to fall in love and having his heart broken.

This book is a fun, sweet read perfect for Christmas time. Once I picked up the book it just flew by. I could see myself just curling under a cozy blanket or sitting in front of a fireplace reading this, those are just the vibes this book gives off. I liked that you got alternating points of view, getting both Dan and Evie’s perspective on what was happening. I did feel like this book left a lot of loose ends. I wish we had gotten more of what Sasha thought about Dan and Evie together. I wish there had been just one heart to heart conversation with either Sasha and Dan or Sasha and Evie with what was happening in their relationship. I feel like it would have really added a wonderful depth to the story. I also felt like Dan had a few too many problems. He had commitment issues because of his parents marriage, guilt over an accident with his brother, an unplanned pregnancy with an ex-girlfriend. Because there was so much going on, none of these issues got the full development they needed. some just felt unnecessary.

Overall, this is a fun book. It is a quick read, perfect if you are looking for a book to get you in the Christmas spirit. Thanks to NetGalley and Bookouture for the ARC.

RATING: 3/5

Review: The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“Fifteen years ago, summer camper Emma Davis watched sleepily as her three cabin mates snuck out of their cabin in the dead of night. The last she–and anyone–saw of them was Vivian closing the cabin door behind her, hushing Emma with a finger pressed to her lips.

Now a rising star in the NYC art scene, Emma turns her past into paintings.. They catch the attention of Francesca Harris-White, the socialite and wealthy owner of the very same Camp Nightingale–and when Francesca implores Emma to return to the camp as a painting counselor, Emma sees an opportunity to find closure and move on.

Yet, it is immediately clear that all is not right at Camp Nightingale. Already haunted by surfacing memories, Emma is suddenly plagued by a security camera pointed directly at her cabin, mounting mistrust from Francesca, and, most disturbing of all, cryptic clues Vivian apparently left behind about the camp’s twisted origins. And as history begins to repeat itself and three girls go missing again, Emma must face threats from both man and nature in order to uncover all the buried secrets–including what really happened all those years ago.”

REVIEW:

Riley Sager has become an instant read author for me, so I’ve been slowly working my way through his novels. The Last Time I Lied has an interesting premise and was a perfect summer thriller.

The Last Time I Lied follows Emma Davis. Her life was forever changed with one stay at summer camp when the rest of the girls in her cabin go missing. The camp never reopened and Emma has been secretly pouring her trauma out into her artwork for the last fifteen years. Camp Nightingale has reopened and Emma has been invited back to teach art. Now, Emma has a chance to gain closure and find out what really happened to the missing girls.

Riley Sager does an unreliable narrator incredibly well and Emma is definitely unreliable. This definitely ended up being the perfect summer thriller with its summertime setting. We jump back and forth in time, with chapters bouncing between present day and that fateful summer. We also have the Riley Sager staple of a mysterious attractive guy who is also the lead’s prime suspect for the murder.

I couldn’t put this book down since all I wanted to do was figure out what happened. Sager’s reveals are somewhat hit or miss for me, but this one really works. I didn’t really see either of the big reveals coming and I loved how they played out. I definitely recommend if you are looking to close out your summer with a great thriller or building up your TBR for the spooky months.

RATING: 4/5

Review: The Siren by Katherine St. John

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“In the midst of a sizzling hot summer, some of Hollywood’s most notorious faces are assembled on the idyllic Caribbean island of St. Genesius to film The Siren, starring dangerously handsome megastar Cole Power playing opposite his ex-wife, Stella Rivers. The surefire blockbuster promises to entice audiences with its sultry storyline and intimately connected cast.

Three very different women arrive on set, each with her own motive. Stella, an infamously unstable actress, is struggling to reclaim the career she lost in the wake of multiple, very public breakdowns. Taylor, a fledgling producer, is anxious to work on a film she hopes will turn her career around after her last job ended in scandal. And Felicity, Stella’s mysterious new assistant, harbors designs of her own that threaten to upend everyone’s plans.

With a hurricane brewing offshore, each woman finds herself trapped on the island, united against a common enemy. But as deceptions come to light, misplaced trust may prove more perilous than the storm itself.”

REVIEW:

I picked The Siren up on a whim while exploring the bookstore and it was a perfect summer read. It gives off if The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo were a thriller vibes. If you like Hollywood and tabloids, you will enjoy this book.

The Siren follows three very different women as they arrive on the set of the new film The Siren. Each woman has a different motive for taking this job. Stella has struggled for the last decade and is trying to revive her failing film career. Taylor, the producer whose career has taken a beating, is hoping for a scandal free shoot so she can bury her past scandal. And Felicity, Stella’s new miracle worker assistant, harbors a secret that could ruin everything.

We have three dueling perspectives that help to move this story forward. This book sucks you in as you try and put all of the pieces together. All three female leads are unique and interesting and make this book fly by. This book has a little bit of everything and the last 100 pages are wild. The setting beautifully transforms as the plot moves forward. Tensions grow just as a hurricane arrives offshore. There are also various tabloid articles interested throughout to help give the public perception of these characters. We know their inner workings and their side of the story, but all the facts aren’t always shared with the public. This helps to really understand the stakes for these women and their careers.

Katherine St. John writes three very flawed women who even if they initially, seem unlikable you are ultimately rooting for them by the book’s end. I enjoyed that these women come together and end up working incredibly well with each other. You think they will be oil and water, but with them being able to work together they have a real chance of saving themselves.

This book is the perfect beach read, and I definitely recommend grabbing this for the Labor Day holiday.

RATING: 5/5

Review: Tokyo Ever After by Emiko Jean

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“Izumi Tanaka has never really felt like she fit in—it isn’t easy being Japanese American in her small, mostly white, northern California town. Raised by a single mother, it’s always been Izumi—or Izzy, because “It’s easier this way”—and her mom against the world. But then Izzy discovers a clue to her previously unknown father’s identity… and he’s none other than the Crown Prince of Japan. Which means outspoken, irreverent Izzy is literally a princess.

In a whirlwind, Izzy travels to Japan to meet the father she never knew and discover the country she always dreamed of. But being a princess isn’t all ball gowns and tiaras. There are conniving cousins, a hungry press, a scowling but handsome bodyguard who just might be her soulmate, and thousands of years of tradition and customs to learn practically overnight.

Izzy soon finds herself caught between worlds, and between versions of herself—back home, she was never “American” enough, and in Japan, she must prove she’s “Japanese” enough. Will Izumi crumble under the weight of the crown, or will she live out her fairytale, happily ever after?”

REVIEW:

Tokyo Ever After was immediately added to my TBR when I saw the Princess Diaries comparisons. That is one of my favorite book series and movies, so I was excited to read a familiar story with a different take.

Tokyo Ever After follows Izumi, she has never known who her father was growing up with her single mom. The book doesn’t dwell on this for too long, and it is quickly revealed who Izumi’s father is and how this will drastically change her life. Izumi has always wanted to belong but never felt like she did in her predominately white hometown. She sees this as an opportunity to learn her history and have a chance of calling someplace home.

This book was completely wonderful, and I couldn’t put it down once I picked it up. I mean honestly who hasn’t dreamed of secretly being an actual princess. This book is sweet and laugh out funny at times. I loved Izumi’s relationship with her mother and her blossoming relationship with her father. The family aspect of this novel is incredible. You really feel Izumi’s frustrations and heartbreak along with her. Now let’s get to the romance! Bodyguard and Princess romance, sign me up. Seriously, their romance was sugary sweet and I loved every moment of it.

I can’t say enough good things about this book! It’s fun, sweet, and hopeful with a dash of drama mixed in. There was even a genuine surprise for me toward the end. Please add this book to your TBR and read it immediately! I will be counting down the days to the sequel.

RATING: 5/5

Review: Mary Jane by Jessica Anya Blau

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“In 1970s Baltimore, fourteen-year-old Mary Jane loves cooking with her mother, singing in her church choir, and enjoying her family’s subscription to the Broadway Show Tunes of the Month record club. Shy, quiet, and bookish, she’s glad when she lands a summer job as a nanny for the daughter of a local doctor. A respectable job, Mary Jane’s mother says. In a respectable house.

The house may look respectable on the outside, but inside it’s a literal and figurative mess: clutter on every surface, IMPEACHMENT: Now More Than Ever bumper stickers on the doors, cereal and takeout for dinner. And even more troublesome (were Mary Jane’s mother to know, which she does not): The doctor is a psychiatrist who has cleared his summer for one important job—helping a famous rock star dry out. A week after Mary Jane starts, the rock star and his movie star wife move in.

Over the course of the summer, Mary Jane introduces her new household to crisply ironed clothes and a family dinner schedule, and has a front-row seat to a liberal world of sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll (not to mention group therapy). Caught between the lifestyle she’s always known and the future she’s only just realized is possible, Mary Jane will arrive at September with a new idea about what she wants out of life, and what kind of person she’s going to be.”

REVIEW:

I discovered this book when doing research for a blog post. This book ended up being the perfect summer read, and I’m so glad I picked it up.

Fourteen-year-old Mary Jane will be spending her summer as a nanny in what turns out to be a rather eccentric household. Growing up in a strict household, there are certain rules she must abide by. When entering the Cones’ household, it is like entering a different world. Mary Jane’s world is opened up by these experiences and soon seems to contemplate the way she has been raised.

Blau manages to completely capture the voice of a 14-year old girl, and Mary Jane is so incredibly relatable. The author also manages to capture the world of the 1970s perfectly, where the world was drastically changing and a new normal was being established. The author also manages to perfectly convey that feeling of being on the cusp of adulthood. Being 14 you are starting to think a bit more independently and learning and growing as a person. This book is incredibly hopeful while also discussing some heavy topics.

Mary Jane definitely feels like the ultimate summer read or a perfect beach read. I genuinely couldn’t put this book down once I picked it and it just flies by. It has great storytelling and an incredible cast of characters. It does have a very open ending allowing the reader to really decide what could happen going forward for Mary Jane.

I definitely recommend checking out Mary Jane. If you are looking for the perfect summer read or just a new fresh book, this one doesn’t disappoint.

RATING: 4.5/5

ARC Review: The Charm Offensive by Alison Chocrun

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“Dev Deshpande has always believed in fairy tales. So it’s no wonder then that he’s spent his career crafting them on the long-running reality dating show Ever After. As the most successful producer in the franchise’s history, Dev always scripts the perfect love story for his contestants, even as his own love life crashes and burns. But then the show casts disgraced tech wunderkind Charlie Winshaw as its star.

Charlie is far from the romantic Prince Charming Ever After expects. He doesn’t believe in true love, and only agreed to the show as a last-ditch effort to rehabilitate his image. In front of the cameras, he’s a stiff, anxious mess with no idea how to date twenty women on national television. Behind the scenes, he’s cold, awkward, and emotionally closed-off.

As Dev fights to get Charlie to connect with the contestants on a whirlwind, worldwide tour, they begin to open up to each other, and Charlie realizes he has better chemistry with Dev than with any of his female co-stars. But even reality TV has a script, and in order to find to happily ever after, they’ll have to reconsider whose love story gets told.”

REVIEW:

I received The Charm Offensive ARC from the publisher. This book was fun and romantic and had oodles of representation, which was incredible. If you enjoyed Red, White, and Royal Blue, or One to Watch then this book will definitely interest you.

The Charm Offensive follows Dev and Charlie. Dev is a producer and handler on Ever After, a successful Bachelor-esque reality show. Dev believes in fairytale romances and helps to craft these romances every year. This season is a bit rough for Dev, having just broken up with his long-time boyfriend who also happens to work at Ever After with him. Charlie is this year’s new bachelor. He’s a bit different than the normal Ever After bachelor, being that he isn’t a former contestant. He is looking to rehab his image after a bad split from his tech company. Dev and Charlie form a connection almost immediately, which is rare for Charlie. This follows the up and downs of love and friendship, and how falling in love on a reality show can happen but maybe not always with the people you intend.

Dev and Charlie’s romance and chemistry are spectacular. I really connected with Dev and his depression. Suffering from depression myself, it often feels like I have to put on a face for people. So, Dev’s journey of coming to terms with his depression, and that people can and will love all of him was beautiful. All of the characters are wonderful and fully fleshed out. The relationships and friendships feel real and authentic. I also loved the frank discussions of mental health and therapy throughout this book.

This book has a ton of representation! Dev is an Indian American, gay, and suffers from depression. Charlie comes to terms with his asexuality throughout this book and suffers from OCD and severe anxiety. These are things that aren’t found in your average romance and what I really loved about this book.

I definitely recommend you pick up The Charm Offensive when it comes out on September 7th!

RATING: 4/5

Review: A Touch of Ruin by Scarlett St. Clair

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“Persephone’s relationship with Hades has gone public and the resulting media storm disrupts her normal life and threatens to expose her as the Goddess of Spring.

Hades, God of the Dead, is burdened by a hellish past that everyone’s eager to expose in an effort to warn Persephone away. Things only get worse when a horrible tragedy leaves Persephone’s heart in ruin and Hades refusing to help. Desperate, she takes matters into her own hands, striking bargains with severe consequences.

Faced with a side of Hades she never knew and crushing loss, Persephone wonders if she can truly become Hades’ queen.”

REVIEW:

I love re-tellings of the Hades and Persephone myth, so when I read A Touch of Darkness last year I completely loved it. So I immediately added all of the series to my TBR. Then I read some of the mixed reviews of A Touch of Ruin, which made me hesitate.

A Touch of Ruin picks up right after the events in A Touch of Darkness. Persephone is coming to terms with her new powers and strength, dealing with her mother’s deception, and trying to juggle her life in the Upperworld and Underworld. Persephone and Hades’ relationship still has all the passion, but Persephone’s self-doubts begin to creep in and do damage to their relationship. A tragic event occurs that puts even more strain on their relationship and you wonder whether it will survive.

A Touch of Ruin is about Persephone’s journey accepting change. Overwhelming change can feel like a bad thing at times but Persephone realizes, by the end of this novel, that most of the changes have been for the better. This book is a rollercoaster. So much happens! Many of the reviews I read were that Persephone’s actions are incredibly frustrating throughout the book. They aren’t wrong. Persephone and Hades have horrible communication skills, and it is the root cause of every single problem. She feels like she is in an endless cycle of not understanding why Hades did something and instead of asking him, picks the worst way to solve the problem. Then doesn’t understand why Hades is angry with her. Then she gets mad at Hades because he is mad at her. Hades isn’t in the clear here either. If he was just upfront and honest about some of his actions, we wouldn’t be in this mess. It does feel like Persephone and Hades make the same mistakes over and over again in this book.

My biggest problem with this book is that the author doesn’t give anything time to breathe. This book evolves at an incredibly fast pace which makes it a quick read, but so much is happening and nothing has any time to settle. We are just jumping from one plot point to the next at a breakneck speed. Even with its problems, I still enjoyed this book. It has some wonderful smutty goodness and Hermes and Hecate are incredible side characters. I’m excited to see where this story goes because I think it is heading to some exciting places.

RATING: 3/5

Book Recommendations: Music Lovers Edition

If you are on Bookstagram or Booktok, I’m sure you’ve seen the novel, Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid recommended time and time again. It’s an amazing, quick read and I definitely recommend it, but there are even more novels out there in the same style. So if you loved Daisy Jones & The Six or are a music lover in the general you definitely need to check out these books.

The Final Revival of Opal and Nev by Dawnie Walton


The Final Revival of Opal & Nev by Dawnie Walton is a novel about the rise of an iconic interracial rock duo in the 1970s. As a tie in with their reunion tour, both Opal and Nev have agreed to a tell-all book. As these artists tell their side of the story, nasty allegations are revealed that could threaten the whole reunion.

Told in the same oral history/interview style as Daisy Jones & The Six, Walton manages to weave real life events with her fictional events making for an incredibly believable story. Because it is told in an oral history style I found it to be a super quick read. It reflects the 70s and today incredibly well, showing everything from the good, the bad, and the ugly. Walton never shies away from tough topics and handles them with care. There is revelation about halfway through the book that shocked me, and left my mouth gaping open.

The Unraveling of Cassidy Holmes by Elissa R. Sloan

The Unraveling of Cassidy Holmes tells the story of Cassidy Holmes aka “Sassy Gloss” of the fictional pop group Gloss. They were the hottest pop group in the early 2000’s, until they fell apart. Now Cassidy Holmes is dead, suicide. The media and her former bandmates are reeling from this news.

The story jumps back and forth in time. All the past chapters are from Cassidy’s point of view, while the present chapters are told from the other band members. This book tackles tough topics, mental health, eating disorders, and sexual assault. Essentially, anything that a young female pop singer might have gone through in the early 2000s. It isn’t an easy read by any means because of the topics discussed, but they are handled with care. As someone who grew up listening to early 2000s pop, this was such an interesting read.

#FreeBritney

Mary Jane: A Novel by Jessica Anya Blau

“Almost Famous meets Daisy Jones & The Six in this funny, wise, and tender novel about a fourteen-year-old girl’s coming of age in 1970s Baltimore, caught between her straight-laced family and the progressive family she nannies for–who happen to be secretly hiding a famous rock star and his movie star wife for the summer.”

I just finished this and it is the perfect summer read. The author manages to perfectly capture the voice of a 14 year-old and Mary Jane is incredibly relatable. This book is about a young girl finding her voice and branching out for the first time in her life. It definitely gives off Almost Famous and Daisy Jones & The Six vibes. Once I picked it up I couldn’t put it down.

These are just some of my recommendations, and let me know if you decide to check them out! Also let me know if you have any recommendations to add to this list.

Review: Lore by Alexandra Bracken

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.”

REVIEW:

Lore has been on my TBR for the last couple of months because I am a sucker for any type of involvement of Greek Mythology. I was a little hesitant because I had read some mixed reviews from reviewers I normally agree with, but it became available at my library so I just had to grab it.

I’ve seen Lore described as Greek mythology meets Hunger Games, which feels pretty accurate. We follow Lore, whose entire life had been built around family legacy and the Agon. She is the only surviving member of her family, who were victims of the last Agon. Because of this destruction and other traumas that have happened to her being a part of this world, Lore made the decision to leave it all behind. She has been successful in blending into the world around her until now. Her old friend Castor has re-entered her life after she thought he was dead and now an injured god is on her doorstep. The next Agon has begun and Lore has been brought right into the middle of it.

Lore had a bit of a slow start for me. The first 100 pages were a slog to get through, but it definitely begins to pick up after that. It took me a while to remember which family was which and who was loyal to who if I’m going to be perfectly honest. I felt like I needed a pinboard or chart so I could go back and reference to make sure I was correct.

There was a lot that I really enjoyed about this book. It has a really interesting concept that hooks you in and is definitely explored well. Lore has been through the wringer, she really has never had an easy life and this book does not get any easier for her. I loved the cast of characters and friendships as well. Lore and Miles are incredible together and I loved how they meshed with Castor and Van.

This story is definitely brutal, and a lot is happening at any given time which, for me, sometimes hurts this book. The characters are constantly on the move which keeps the pacing exciting. I do wish that this had been told from a dual POV. I think it would have added an interesting element to this story if it had bounced between Lore and Castor. It grew frustrating when they were separated from each other and would have no idea what was happening with the other group, and you are never really filled in on those events

Overall, I enjoyed Lore. It was different than anything I have read recently. Fair warning, this book is absolutely brutal at times, deals with heavy topics such as sexual assault and murder, and doesn’t shy away from violence.

RATING: 4/5

Review: A Heart So Fierce & Broken by Brigid Kemmerer

SYNOPSIS (via Goodreads):

“The curse is finally broken, but Prince Rhen of Emberfall faces darker troubles still. Rumors circulate that he is not the true heir and that forbidden magic has been unleashed in Emberfall. Although Rhen has Harper by his side, his guardsman Grey is missing, leaving more questions than answers.

Rumored to be the heir, Grey has been on the run since he destroyed Lilith. He has no desire to challenge Rhen–until Karis Luran once again threatens to take Emberfall by force. Her own daughter Lia Mara sees the flaws in her mother’s violent plan, but can she convince Grey to stand against Rhen, even for the good of Emberfall?

The heart-pounding, compulsively readable saga continues as loyalties are tested and new love blooms in a kingdom on the brink of war.”

REVIEW:

A Heart So Fierce & Broken is the second book in the Cursebreakers series by Brigid Kemmerer. I absolutely loved A Curse So Dark & Lonely so I was excited to pick up this book. This is the second book in the series, so there will be a few spoilers. Proceed with caution.

This book picks up with the big reveal of Grey being the missing heir. The kingdom of Emberfall has been thrown into chaos. The curse has been broken, the “monster” is now gone, but a civil war is brewing over the missing heir. There is also discourse over the kingdom of Disi. Princess Harper promised (non-existent) troops and the people grow leery of this promise. Grey must come to terms with his new status, and make the ultimate decision about the future of Emberfall.

Okay, so I didn’t love this book which was really frustrating. First, let’s talk about the things I liked. The pacing is great in this book, even though I didn’t really love it, the plot really moved. I liked learning more about the kingdom of Emberfall and the addition of characters from the kingdom of Sylh Shallow. I also enjoyed the relationship between Lia Mara and her sister.

Now, let’s get to the parts that I didn’t enjoy. The thing I loved about A Curse So Dark & Lonely was Harper and she is nowhere to be found. The book mainly alternates between Grey and Lia Mara’s points of view, which makes sense since this is more Grey’s book. I just figured that there would be some chapters with her, involving what was happening in Emberfall. I also felt that this book shoved Rhen back to the starting point. All the character growth shown in the first book was completely lost. I guess my struggle was that it felt like this book had no point. They spent the whole book traveling, and Grey was so lost personally that it felt like the character just lost his voice. I still feel like I don’t understand why Grey wants the throne. With the epilogue reveal, it feels like we are just back to the very start of the series which I don’t love.

Overall, this book was a disappointment, so much so that I considered not finishing it. It is a testament to Kemmerer’s writing that I was compelled to finish. I’m still going to pick up the last book in the series because I need to know how Harper’s story ends.

RATING: 3/5